Nortel Networks Institute Distinguished Seminar Series
(NNIDSS) :: Talks (year 2005)


 


All talks index :: 2005

Note: Everyone is welcome.

2005
2
 
Date

Tuesday, Nov. 29th, 2005

Title MIMO communications in the real world
By

Dr. Tricia Willink
Communications Research Centre

Venue DC 1302, University of Waterloo (Directions...)
Time 2:00-3:00 PM
Abstract of the Talk

The production of papers in the area of MIMO communications has been phenomenal in recent years. Only a small percentage, however, escribe MIMO techniques operating in real propagation environments or address the problems that arise in practical systems. Current MIMO research at CRC focusses on these problems. In this presentation, the performance of different MIMO techniques will be evaluated using measurement data obtained with the CRC MIMO testbed, and some of the issues that face real MIMO communication systems will be discussed. A case study using eigenbeamforming will be presented, demonstrating the use of MIMO in an unconventional application and illustrating its limitations.

Presentation File  
Biography

Tricia Willink has an MA from Queens' College, Cambridge University, and completed her PhD in electrical engineering at Queen's University in 1993. Since then, she has been a Research Scientist at the Communications Research Centre in Ottawa, where she is currently group leader for research in high capacity terrestrial communications.



 
Date

Friday, Sept. 23rd, 2005

Title Some Perspectives on Future of Wireless Networks
By

Dr. Al Javed
Former Vice-President, Wireless Networks Technology, Nortel Networks

Venue DC 1302, University of Waterloo (Directions...)
Time 10-11 AM
Abstract of the Talk

Wireless Networks are evolving and becoming pervasive rapidly. They are now allowing every device including our home appliances to be connected to the network. In this talk, Al will share his views on how these Wireless Networks will evolve in the near to long term and what services they will be capable of. He will focus on market drivers, technology evolution, network architectures, system performance and its impacts on delivering new services.throughput in MIMO networks in both single- and multi-user scenarios.

Presentation File  
Biography

Dr. Al Javed joined Nortel in 1977 as a member of the scientific staff in the system engineering division. Before joining Nortel, he served on the faculties of the University of Alberta, and the University of Engineering and Technology in Pakistan. Since joining Nortel, Dr. Javed has held a number of management positions in the areas of system design, systems planning, technology development, and product development. Since 1988, he has been leading wireless R&D activities in Nortel Networks. He has pioneered the development of a number of leading edge wireless products, including world’s high capacity trunking radio using 512 QAM modulation CT-2 based in-building wireless radio and triple mode software defined TDMA cellular access radio which was Nortel’s first product in cellular arena and was highly successful commercially leading to a 1B$ annual sale. He has been instrumental in developing and integrating leading edge technologies in Nortel’s Wireless Access portfolio, including ‘CDMA 2000 & UMTS systems’. He also pioneered Nortel’s recent Wireless Mesh Network product line. More recently, he has been responsible for developing next generation wireless technologies and product concepts, including MIMO & Antenna Array Processing and Mesh Networking. Dr. Javed recently retired from Nortel and is now president of his own company Javed Wireless Technologies Inc.

Dr. Javed has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Alberta, Canada.




Date

Monday, May 9th, 2005

Title Mobile Hotspots
By

Dr. Shahrokh Valaee
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
University of Toronto

Venue EIT 3142, University of Waterloo (Directions...)
Time 11:00 AM - noon
Abstract of the Talk

In recent years, the hotspot technology has gained tremendous popularity with the increased demand for mobile wireless access. Today, we witness the proliferation of hotspots in public areas such as coffee shops, shopping malls, airports, train stations, etc. The obvious extension would be to provide high bit rate connectivity for users traveling in vehicular speeds, hence mobile hotspots.

This talk proposes a multihop architecture to facilitate mobile hotspots. In the proposed approach, data are decomposed into smaller fragments, and extra fragments are generated using an appropriate erasure coding scheme. All fragments are then poured upon the traveling vehicle from repeaters, located along the route of the vehicle. We metaphorically describe this approach by information raining, at which data are fragmented into small pieces and rained upon the vehicle.

I will also discuss how IEEE 802.16 can be used in the backhaul link to connect the base station to the repeaters. We propose spatio-temporal scheduling as a means to increase downlink throughput. The spatio-temporal scheduler distributes data traffic both in time and space, and indeed exploits mobility to increase the throughput. Simulation results show that a substantial improvement can be obtained when data are scheduled in both temporal and spatial domains.  throughput in MIMO networks in both single- and multi-user scenarios.

Presentation File  
Biography

Shahrokh Valaee received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from Tehran, University, Tehran, Iran, and his Ph.D. degree from McGill University, Montreal, Canada, all in Electrical Engineering. From 1994 to 1995 he was a Research Associate at INRS-Telecommunications, University of Quebec, Montreal, Canada. From 1996 to 2001 he was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran, and also an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran. He is now an Associate Professor in the Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto. His current research in high-speed networking focuses on quality-of-service (QoS) guarantees, multi-protocol label switching (MPLS), traffic modeling and flow classification, and wireless local area networks (WLAN).




Date

Thursday, April 28th, 2005

Title Cognitive Radio: Brain Empowered wireless communications
By

Dr. Simon Haykin
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
McMaster University

Venue EIT 3141, University of Waterloo (Directions...)
Time 11:00 AM - noon
Abstract of the Talk

Cognitive radio is a new and exciting approach to wireless communications, the objective of which is to improve spectral efficiency of existing bands. It exploits several disciplines: Communication theory, Mesh networks, Signal processing, Control theory, Game Theory, Machine learning.

In this lecture, I will explain how these disciplines come together to open up some new and important potential applications for wireless. The lecture will build on my invited paper, with the same title as my lecture, which appeared in the February issue of the IEEE J, Selected Areas in Communications.

Presentation File  
Biography

Simon Haykin (F'86) received the B.Sc. (First Class Honors), Ph.D., and D.Sc. degrees in 1953, 1956, and 1967, all in electrical engineering from the University of Birmingham, U.K. On completion of his Ph.D. studies, he spent several years from 1956 to 1965 in industry and academe in the U.K. In 1972, in collaboration with several faculty members, he established the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL), Ottawa, ON, Canada, specializing in signal processing applied to radar and communications. He stayed on as the CRL Director until 1993. In 1996, the Senate of McMaster University established the new title of University Professor; in April of that year, he was appointed the first University Professor from the Faculty of Engineering. He is the author, coauthor, and editor of over 40 books, which include the widely used text books: Communications Systems (New York: Wiley, 4th ed.), Adaptive Filter Theory (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall), and Neural Networks: A Comprehensive Foundation (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall); these three books have been translated into many different languages all over the world. He is the Founding Technical Editor of Adaptive and Learning Systems for Signal Processing, Communications, and Control (New York: Wiley). His research interest have focused on adaptive signal processing, for which he is recognized world wide. He has published hundreds of papers in leading journals on adaptive processing algorithms and their applications. Currently, at the invitation of the Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, he is spearheading a major research initiative on nanotechnology at McMaster University, a technology that has significant implications for a high diverse list of disciplines, including health-related areas. Dr. Haykin is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. In 1999, he was awarded the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Technical Science from ETH, Zurich, Switzerland.




Date

Friday, January 21st, 2005

Title Linear Precoding in MIMO Systems
By

Dr. Ravi Adve
University of Toronto

Venue EIT 3141, University of Waterloo (Directions...)
Time 2:30-3:30 pm
Abstract of the Talk

Recently, precoding has emerged as an effective approach to maximize data throughput in MIMO networks in both single- and multi-user scenarios. However, in a large part, the analyses undertaken have been information theoretic with limited attention paid to schemes to implement precoding. This talk with focus on recent results in single-user precoding with covariance feedback and multi-user linear precoding with channel feedback. The talk will conclude with preliminary results on precoding with limited rate feedback.

Presentation File  
Biography

Ravi Adve received his B. Tech. degree in Electrical Engineering from IIT, Bombay in 1990 and his Ph.D. from Syracuse University in 1996. Between 1997 and August 2000, he worked for Research Associates for Defense Conversion (RADC) Inc. on contract with the Air Force Research Laboratory at Rome, NY. He joined the faculty at the University of Toronto in August 2000. Dr. Adve's research interests include practical signal processing algorithms for smart antennas with applications in wireless communications and radar. He is currently focused on practical precoding in various scenarios and cooperation in sensor networks.





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